Finds information

Treasure Act Finds And Finds Of National Importance.

All these finds have been found on our trips and have gone through the treasure act of 1996, Most have been returned and some are going through the treasure act as I’m writing this.

Viking Pin From Brooch, Kindly Donated By M Martin To Museum Curator Tim Pestell Of Norwich Museum.

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PIN

Unique ID: NMS-FD4FFA

Viking copper alloy loop-headed ringed pin of the Late Saxon period, the ring missing and the shank bent and cracked. The top has been hammered and curled over into a loop of flat-section. The head is of square cross-section, with the reverse engraved with a row of Xs and overlapping Vs and the front moulded into the form of a highly stylised downward facing animal. Very shallow curving lines on one side are probably the result of damage or wear. A transverse engraved line around all four faces marks the base of the head. The upper half of the shank is sub-square in cross-section and the lower half square. For discussions of ringed pins and their Hiberno-Norse and Scandinavian backgrounds see Fanning 1994, Griffiths, D. in Griffiths et al. 2007, 67-9, Graham-Campbell 1980, cat. no. 204, Mainman and Rogers 2000, 2580-2, and NMGW-E8F8A8. It is likely that the present example is of Scandinavian origin, like others found in East Anglia, at Brooke, Norfolk (HER 28863, Margeson 1997, fig. 20; Fanning 1994, 21), Congham, Norfolk (HER 3565), and Stanton, Suffolk (NMS-60EDC6). Length 128mm. Width and thickness at loop 8.4 and 4.5mm. Weight 12.44g. Late 9th – 10th century.

Anglo Saxon Carolingian Solid Silver Mount Inlaid With Niello, Dates to 850 to 1000 A.D.

Weight 12.1 Grams, 25mm long by 19mm wide.

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Museum Report, Unique ID: NMS-ADCA16

Description: Rectangular Carolingian-style silver mount, partly gilded and inlaid with niello, and decorated with Carolingian-style plant ornament. The front of the mount, which has high, curved sides, is decorated in relief, the higher-relief sections of the design inlaid with niello and the lower-relief sections gilded. The selective gilding appears to be deliberate, rather than the result of wear on the higher relief elements of the design.

The design is centred around an X-shaped cross in high relief, with the arms curving inwards to form two back-to-back C shapes (when the mount is viewed with the long edges horizontal) or point-to-point heart shapes (when the mount is viewed with the short edges horizontal). The cross is inlaid with a complex niello pattern consisting of central longitudinal lines, arrows towards the centre and transverse lines dividing the arms from their bifurcated foliate terminals.

In the centre of each long edge is a lozengiform or oval high-relief moulding, probably intended as leaf-shaped, with tri-lobed niello inlay, surrounded by a gilded, lower-relief, triangular veined leaf with scalloped edges, which fills the internal angles of the central cross.

In the centre of each short edge is a high-relief moulding consisting of two similar leaf shapes, each with a trilobed inlay, in mirror-image and separated from each other by a central band inlaid with two transverse lines of niello. These are again surrounded by a gilded, lower-relief, triangular veined leaf with scalloped edges, which fills the internal angles of the central cross.

The lower leaf-shaped motifs extend to the edges of each side. On the short edges, they are flanked by veined, opposed leaves without gilding and perhaps originally with niello in the veining. On the long edges, they are flanked by smooth, perhaps worn quarter-circle bosses, each with an inlaid strip of niello on the upper edge.

The reverse is deeply recessed, with an off-centre sub-circular blind hole, probably a casting flaw. The rim around the hollowed reverse has two integral, rectangular-sectioned attachment spikes projecting from the short edges. Both spikes taper very slightly to breaks and are now slightly bent. The breaks at either end of the spikes are not very recent, but are not very worn and are slightly granular in the centre.

Dimensions: length 25mm, width 19mm, thickness (excluding attachment spikes) 6.5mm. Maximum surviving length of attachment spike 9.5mm. Weight 12.1g.

Discussion and Date: Similar mounts and strap-ends with the same style of decoration are recorded on the PAS database from Suffolk (SF-E2FFD6 and ESS-BE9A25), North Yorkshire (YORYM-EAF943), unprovenanced (FAHG-123AB4) and Norfolk (NMS-5BAC02). They all date from the mid 9th to the end of the 10th century AD.

Notes:

As the object is made of more than 10% precious metal and is over 300 years old, it constitutes potential Treasure under the Treasure Act 1996.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure

Treasure details

Treasure case tracking number: 2013T195

Chronology

Ascribed Culture: Carolingian
Date from: Circa AD 850
Date to: Circa AD 1000

 

17th/18th Century Gold Ring, Complete but with no makers mark.

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Two Fused Together Celtic Iceni Crescent Moon Silver units.

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16th/17th Century Solid Silver Seal Matrix.

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Tudor Gold Gilded Solid Silver Cap Hook, With Filigree Decoration, Weight 5.8 Grams, Diameter 17.5mm.

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Museum Report, Unique ID: NMS-4B14D5

Post-medieval silver-gilt cap-hook. Circular back-plate with separate soldered domed front decorated with twisted filigree wire and pellets. Three large circles of wire, each containing a central pellet (one surviving) with wire annulet, surrounded by six (in one circle) and seven (in two) further wire annulets. Around the edge between each of the large wire circles is a pellet surrounded by a wire annulet with three pellets around the edge. There is a large central pellet at the apex of the domed front-plate.

On the reverse is a separate soldered circular-sectioned hook, now broken, but no evidence for a loop, indicating that this is a cap-hook and not a dress-hook. Gilding survives on the front, back and part of the hook.

Diameter 17.5mm. Height (excluding hook) 10mm. Weight 5.8g. 16th century.

The decoration is similar to that on a heart-shaped dress-hook from New Romney, Kent (Gaimster et al, 2002, 162, fig.3) and many other examples of composite silver-gilt dress-hooks with filigree wire and pellet decoration have been recorded.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

Solid Silver Medieval Annular brooch, Dates to 1200 to 1350 A.D, weight 3.5 Grams, Diameter 26mm.

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Museum Report, Unique ID: NMS-ADAAF6

Silver annular brooch. Circular sectioned frame, now slightly distorted, with four equally spaced and separately made knops each of which encloses the frame and is decorated with closely spaced and overlapping stamped annulets. A similar knop surrounds the shank of the pin next to the loop. See Dress Accessories (2002) fig. 163 no. 1330 and 1333. 13th – early 14th century. Diameter 26mm. Weight 3.5g.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

Viking Chipped Carved Trefoil Brooch Arm, Re-used As A Pendant, Dates to 10th Century A.D, Donated to Museum by Bud.

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Anglo Saxon Solid Silver Winchester type Strap-end

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Museum Report, Unique ID: NMS-C179C1

Late Saxon silver tongue-shaped strap-end of Thomas’s Class E, Type 5, apparently re-used as a brooch. The attachment edge is recessed on the front, with a separate rectangular front-plate to secure the (missing) strap. It is attached with four rivets with rounded heads (one head missing), each surrounded by an annulet made from twisted silver wire.

The plate is cast in low relief within a border following the edge consisting of a pair of ridges separated by a groove; a small length of niello survives in the groove, in the centre at the top. Within this border is a sunken field filled with Carolingian-style relief decoration which is best seen with the attachment end held uppermost. The decoration consists of a central stem with two square bosses, each with an inner border of a groove which may originally have been set with niello. A pair of opposed scrolls springs from the lower corners of the upper boss, curling around and up. Two pairs of opposed scrolls spring from the second boss, one from the upper corners curling downwards, and the other pair from the lower edge of the boss curling upwards. All of these scrolly tendrils end in rounded terminals. The stem terminates in a tear-drop shape with a hollow centre which may originally have been inlaid with niello. The stem and scrolls are reserved on a gilded field, but no gilding can be seen elsewhere, which may be the result of differential gilding or wear.

On the reverse are two large patches of solder, one near the upper edge partially obscuring the reverse of the rivets, and one at the terminal. These strongly suggest a secondary use for this object, probably as a brooch with separate catch-plate and pin lug (now missing) soldered to the reverse, similar to that seen on a copper-alloy example from Norfolk (NMS-393CA2/HER11743).

For a similar strap-end with decoration cast in low relief, gilding and niello, see ESS-BE9A25. Other examples of Carolingian-style gilded silver strap fittings include NMS-638554 (HER56967) and NMS-ADCA16 (HER58413). Thomas suggests a date for this type in the late 9th or 10th century (Thomas 2004, 1).

Length 39mm. Width 25mm. Weight 12.2g.

Notes:

As this object is made of more than 10% precious metal and is over 300 years old, it constitutes potential Treasure under the Treasure Act 1996.

Class: Thomas Class E, Type 5
Evidence of reuse: Solder on the reverse for additional missing fittings.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

Chronology

Period to: EARLY MEDIEVAL
Ascribed Culture: Carolingian
Date from: Circa AD 870
Date to: Circa AD 1000

 

2nd/3rd Century Roman Gold Ring With Garnet

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Museum Report, And unique ID: NMS-BFEEA4

Roman gold finger ring. Flat-sectioned band expanding smoothly from the rear to the bezel with a separate strip of gold soldered to form an oval setting for a cabouchon stone, probably garnet, which appears black in daylight, but red under strong light. The ring is complete but distorted. Mid – late Roman, 200 – 400 AD.

Width at bezel 7.5mm. Weight 4.6g. Original external diameter (estimated) 16mm.

For similar rings with flat, expanding bands and separate settings or bezels, see FAPJW-AB59E5, LIN-22EEF2 and NCL-772344.

 Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure.

 

Anglo Saxon Silver clothes Hook, With Neilo Inlaided.

IMG_9761 - Version 3

Museum Report, Unique ID: NMS-C0DF91

Description: Silver hooked tag of middle or late Anglo-Saxon date. The plate is circular with two circular piercings for attachment close together towards the top. The hook is short and rectangular-sectioned, with the tip missing. The plate is decorated with a central repoussé boss (hollow on the reverse) with an engraved line around it partly filled with niello inlay. From this radiate six engraved lines, again partly filled with niello, which join an outer engraved circle. These lines were probably intended as pairs forming the lower and two side arms of a cross; where the upper arm should have been is now completely removed by the perforations. The engraving, where it can be seen beneath the niello, consists of tiny zig-zags as if the tool was rocked to push it through the metal. This may have been designed to provide a more secure foundation for the niello, Dates 700 to 100 A.D.

Dimensions: Length 14.5mm. Width 12mm. Weight 0.6g.

Discussion and Date: Hooked tags with circular plates are known from the 8th to 11th centuries. This example, with its central boss, may be imitating a 9th-century design (compare KENT-E9F568, LON-585A83, etc). Engraved crosses, whether simple or complex, are a common motif throughout the middle and late Anglo-Saxon periods; compare KENT-AB7CA4, SF-1EFD68, ESS-2C8575, KENT-A31134, NMGW-A96F63, KENT-1100A8, LON-EE0F14, FAKL-410AC3, NMS-0D94F3, etc.

 

 

Decorated Tudor Solid Silver Hairpin

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Museum Report, Unique ID: NMS-BD3138

Post-medieval silver Tudor gilded pin. Globular head decorated with a large central pellet and four twisted wire annulets with central pellets in the upper half, a median band of two strands of twisted wire, and four wire annulets each containing a smaller wire annulet around the broken circular-sectioned shank in the lower half. Gilding survives on the head and possibly the shank. 16th century. A very small example of this type of pin.

Diameter of head 5mm. Height of head 7mm. Diameter of shank 1mm. Weight 0.4g.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

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Tudor Finger Ring

Unique ID: NMS-0D2960

Medieval to post-medieval gold finger ring. The oval-sectioned band expands smoothly from the rear to shoulders which flair before narrowing sharply to join the bezel. The shoulders are engraved to leave a foliate design in low relief, perhaps originally reserved on an inlayed field, although no inlay survives. The bezel is in the form of a high quatrefoil collet with scalloped sides set with a pink or red table cut stone (perhaps a ruby).

For similar examples see Oman (1974, pl.26, a, b and pl.27, b for a broadly similar example with enamel).

Date: 16th century.

Dimensions: Height 19mm. Width 17mm. Internal measurements 12 x 14mm. Width at bezel 7mm. Weight 2.7g.

Notes:

Other finger-rings of a similar date have been found in close proximity to 2014 T323 (2014 T324, 2014 T325 and 2014 T326). It is the curatorial opinion that these four finger-rings may have once formed a hoard which has since been dispersed.

The age and precious metal content of this item therefore qualify it as treasure under the stipulations of the Treasure Act 1996.

Subsequent actions
Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

59800_CFF3F5_PM_FingerRingC

Tudor Finger Ring

Unique ID: NMS-CFF3F5

Gold posy ring. D-sectioned band decorated externally with a foliate design consisting of two stems each with two pairs of leaves before a flower, originally reserved on an enamelled field of which only a tiny pink trace of which survives. Inscribed internally in lombardic script +CAVE+CVI+CREDAS (be careful who you trust) followed by a foliate sprig.
Date: c. early 16th century.
Dimensions: External diameter 21mm. Internal diameter 17mm. Width of band 4.5mm. Weight 3.7g.

Notes:

Other finger-rings of a similar date have been found in close proximity to 2014 T324 (2014 T323, 2014 T325 and 2014 T326). It is the curatorial opinion that these four finger-rings may have once formed a hoard which has since been dispersed.

The age and precious metal content of this item therefore qualify it as treasure under the stipulations of the Treasure Act 1996.

Inscription: +CAVE+CVI+CREDAS

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

59800_CF8A96_PM_FingerRingB

 

 

Tudor Finger Ring

Unique ID: NMS-CF8A96

Post-medieval gold mourning ring. D-sectioned band decorated externally with a shallow rib at either edge, between which four oval cells alternate with five quatrefoil cells (resulting in two quatrefoils next to each other). The oval cells contain a raised quatrefoil and the quatrefoil cells a raised pellet, originally reserved on a field of white enamel only traces of which now survive. Each cell is connected to the next by a median rib with two pellets to either side which were also probably reserved on an enamelled field, possible tiny black traces of which survive.
The internal Latin inscription in Roman capitals DVRVM + PATY + (hard to bear) retaining traces of black enamel or niello.
The external relief decoration of this example is similar to another submitted as Treasure and recorded on the PAS database, 2013 T899 (LEIC-6E8502), along with examples in the British Museum’s collection (2003.0506.1 and 1961.1202.130).
Date: 16th – 17th century.
Dimensions: External diameter 15mm. Internal diameter 13mm. Width of band 3mm. Weight 1.1g.

Notes:

Other finger-rings of a similar date have been found in close proximity to 2014 T325 (2014 T323, 2014 T324 and 2014 T326). It is the curatorial opinion that these four finger-rings may have once formed a hoard which has since been dispersed.

The age and precious metal content of this finger-ring means that it should be considered as potential Treasure under the Treasure Act 1996.

Inscription: DVRVM + PATY +

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

59800_CE74F5_PM_FingerRing

Tudor Finger Ring

Unique ID: NMS-CE74F5

Late medieval or early post-medieval gold mourning ring.

D-sectioned band in the form of nine lozengiform panels separated by angled grooves, decorated alternately with reverse S-shapes and angled ribs probably reserved on a field of black enamel or niello, now missing. There are two reverse S-shape panels next to each other.

Inscribed internally in Roman capitals * * MEMEN+TOMORI followed by a foliate sprig.

Date: The use of Roman capitals for inscriptions on rings was usual in the 16th – 17th century (Oman, 1974, 40 – 41).

Dimensions: Width of band 3mm. External diameter 17 – 18.5mm. Internal diameter 14 – 16mm. Weight 1.4g.

Notes:

Other finger-rings of a similar date have been found in close proximity to 2014 T326 (2014 T323, 2014 T324 and 2014 T325). It is the curatorial opinion that these four finger-rings may have once formed a hoard which has since been dispersed.

The age and precious metal content of this item therefore qualify it as treasure under the stipulations of the Treasure Act 1996.

Inscription: * * MEMEN+TOMORI

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

41868_DAA7DB_MS_StrapEnd

 

 

Saxon Strap-End

Unique ID: NMS-DAA7DB

Fragment of a Late Anglo-Saxon silver strap-end of Thomas’ Class A, Type 1 with Trewhiddle-style decoration. Only the middle section survives, broken across the decorative field at both ends; the attachment end and terminal are both missing. The sides are convex and have a double-ribbed border; the outer rib is decorated with angled transverse grooves while the inner rib is plain. The central field is decorated in low relief with a sinuous, backward-looking beast among looping interlace, one strand of which pierces the beast’s body. The creature’s body fills the middle of the surviving fragment, its neck curving backward from the right-hand side of the field over its back and ending at the left-hand side in a head with a tiny drilled eye. The central field is keyed for niello, only a tiny fragment of which survives.

Surviving length 15mm. Surviving width 16mm. Thickness 1.5mm. Weight 1.7g. 9th century.

Notes:

The design on this strap-end is virtually identical to that on a copper-alloy strap-end from Westmeston, Sussex and now in Barbican House Museum, Lewes (reg. no. LEWSA 1985-20; Webster and Backhouse 1991, cat. no. 193; Thomas 2000, cat. no. 390, fig. 3.6G). Thomas (2000) categorises the Westmeston strap-end as Class A, Type 1, sub-type axii, and the Near Bressingham example would also fit into this category. These strap-ends have been found in a fairly broad distribution south of the Humber (Thomas 2000, Map 9, 464).

The suggested date for this type of strap-end is ninth century, possibly extending into the tenth century.

The age and precious metal content of this item therefore qualify it as treasure under the stipulations of the Treasure Act 1996.

References:

Thomas, G. 2000. A Survey of Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-age Strap-Ends from Britain. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of London

Webster, L. and Backhouse, J., 1991. The Making of England: Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900. London

Class: Thomas Class A, Type 1

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

59804_3643E6_MSLS_Brooch

 

 

Saxon Silver Brooch

Unique ID: NMS-3643E6

Description: Fragment of Middle or Late Anglo-Saxon silver brooch with none of the original outer edge surviving. The plate is in the form of a cross with a separate central decorative silver dome-headed rivet. Each arm of the cross is decorated with a panel of similar but different geometric, perhaps interlaced, decoration reserved on a field of niello, much of which is missing. The quality of the engraving is not high. Each panel is edged with a reserved border, and the central rivet is also surrounded by a reserved border. The arms of the cross flare towards the breaks, and the plate is broken across rounded openwork apertures in the internal angles of the cross.

The breaks are fairly crisp and unworn, but patinated a similar colour to the surface of the brooch and are probably not recent.

Dimensions: Maximum surviving measurements 27 x 16mm. Length of rivet 3mm. Plate less than 1mm thick. Weight 1.7g.

Discussion: The surviving elements appear very similar to NMS-972E58, brooch (c) (HER57139), with the pelta-shaped terminals of the cross meeting to form pelta-shaped apertures in the internal angles. Other examples of similar silver brooches on the PAS database include BM-138695 and LIN-9B7487; and in gilded copper alloy, LIN-01DE95. The group is sometimes known as Elmsett-type brooches, from an example found at Elmsett in Suffolk (West 1998, 25, fig. 24.6).

Date: The use of the Trewhiddle style on many of these brooches dates them broadly to the 9th century.

Notes:

As this object is made of more than 10% precious metal and is over 300 years old, it constitutes potential Treasure under the Treasure Act 1996.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

 

59800_22D466_MSLS_Brooch

 

Saxon Silver Brooch

Unique ID: NMS-22D466

Description: A fragment of a Middle or Late Anglo-Saxon silver brooch. Originally cruciform, the fragment consists of the splayed or pelta-shaped terminal of one arm, with just over one coil of an incomplete integral spring projecting from the edge and coiling under the plate. The plate is broken along the straight edge of a further panel forming the arm of the cross or perhaps the centre of the brooch.

The terminal probably originally joined the terminals of the neighbouring arms to form apertures in the internal angles of the cross, across which the plate is now broken. The terminal is decorated on one face with a panel containing a Trewhiddle-style beast in profile looking left, with upturned head, open mouth biting a pellet, large ear, and two transverse grooves forming a collar around the neck. The tail is interlaced around the body; there may have been a foreleg and hindleg, but the detail is unclear here. The animal is reserved on a field of niello now partially missing.

The break across the body of the brooch is patinated but not very worn. One break on the terminal of the arms of cross is patinated and worn, the other less patinated and less worn. None appear to be very recent.

Dimensions: Surviving length 18mm. Surviving width 21mm. Thickness of plate less than 1mm. Weight 1.3g.

Discussion: Fragments of similar silver brooches are recorded on the PAS database including NMS-972E58(a) (HER57139), BM-138695, NMS-3643E6 and LIN-9B7487. A complete copper-alloy example can be found at LIN-01DE95. These are sometimes known as Elmsett-type brooches from an example found at Elmsett in Suffolk (West 1998, 25, fig. 24.6).

Date: The use of Trewhiddle style is common on this type of brooch, and dates them broadly to the 9th century AD.

Notes:

As this object is made of more than 10% precious metal and is over 300 years old, it constitutes potential Treasure under the Treasure Act 1996.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Submitted for consideration as Treasure.

 

 

59800_201722_PM_DressFitting

 

Tudor Silver Dress Fastener

Unique ID: NMS-201722

Late medieval or post-medieval silver, gilded dress fastener eye-plate. The plate is in the form of an elaborate trefoil, the side foils at right-angles to the central foil, each with a median rib and trefoil terminal, with one straight edge with a very narrow flange. There are two separately applied off-centre pellets. The plate is pierced twice behind the straight edge, with a pierced lobe at the terminal of the vertical foil for attachment. On the reverse is a separate soldered loop now broken in line with the straight edge but which would originally have extended beyond it to receive a hook.

Measuring 13 x 15mm. Weight 1.6g.

For broadly similar examples see NMS-2E7826, HESH-F4A941 and SF6610.

16th century.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure.

 

 

59804_0DB9A5_MED_Pendant

 

Medieval Silver Pendant

Unique ID: NMS-0DB9A5

Medieval silver, gilded pendent cross consisting of a central flat roundel with four oval-sectioned projecting arms each tapering slightly to a globular terminal decorated with multiple stamped annulets, now very worn. A large, transversely pierced suspension loop projects from the terminal of the upper arm. The central disc is decorated on both faces with an outer border of stamped anulets around an engraved AG on one face and LA on the other. The G is much smaller than the A.

AGLA was a popular amuletic charm in the medieval period. The letters stand for “Ata gibor le’olam Adonai” (You are mighty forever, O Lord) (J. P. Robinson, 2007 Treasure Annual Report, page 124, no.247).

Width 27mm. Height 34mm. Diameter of roundel 11mm.Thickness of central roundel 2.5mm. Weight 6.4g.

Multiple similar examples are recorded on the Portable Antiquities Scheme database including SF-EBAF06, YORYM-662485, HAMP-075960, NARC-F3FA72, YORYM-FF8193 and NMS-4180B3.

Circa 13th century.

Inscription: AGLA

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure.

 

 

60419_664EF6_MS_PinSilver pinhead cleaned - Copy

 

 

PIN
Unique ID: NMS-664EF6

Fragment of a medieval silver pin, comprising a polyhedral pinhead and the stub of a collared shaft. The surviving part of the shaft is circular in section with a thicker, circular collar. The pin-head is in the form of a cube with the corners cut off, creating lozengiform and triangular facets. Each facet (except for the base from which the broken shaft projects), is engraved with some traces of niello surviving.

The uppermost lozengiform field has a long line projecting inwards from the centre of each edge with a short line to either side creating a cruciform motif with each arm formed from a trefoil. The four uppermost triangular fields are worn, but appear to be decorated alike with a border around the edge and two short inward projecting lines on each side. The four lozengiform fields around the sides consist of:

A lozengiform crosshatched field within a border;
Four short lines extending inwards from the centre of each edge of the border, creating a quatrefoil motif within which is a cross-crosslets;
A crosshatched field as no. 1
Four crosses each reserved on a lozengiform field of niello arranged with one in each corner of the face.
The lower triangular facets have different numbers of short lines projecting inwards from some or all of the single line border around the edge.

Dimensions: (excluding stub of shaft) 10 x 11 x 11mm. Diameter of collar of shaft 5mm. Diameter of stub of shaft 2mm. Weight 9.1g.

The present example probably dates to the 12th – 13th century on the basis of the style of the decoration which is similar to that commonly found, for example, on finger-rings. Pin-heads or terminals of similar polyhedron form, dated to the 12th-13th century, have also been found at various sites, eg TAR 2001, fig 120 from Rendham, Suffolk; TAR 2003, fig 219 from Woodbridge area, Suffolk; TAR 2004, fig 226 from East Ewell, Surrey, indicating that the form continued into the medieval period.

12th-13th century.
Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure.

 

56989_E12FA8_MED_Crucifix

 

CRUCIFIX

Unique ID: NMS-E12FA8

Incomplete medieval silver crucifix with integrally cast figure of Christ, possibly a pendant. The lower arm of the cross terminates in a trefoil below a transverse rib, the side arms both broken before the end of Christ’s arms, and the upper arm broken flush with the top of the side arms possibly across a perforation. The object is cast and shows Christ with outstretched arms, his head leaning to one side, a knotted loin cloth, and a groove separating the legs. There are traces of gilding the front and possible traces of solder on the reverse.

For broadly similar examples see WAW-485713, SWYOR-4CFE88 and BH-E56948 recorded on the Portable Antiquities Scheme database.

Circa 1300 – 1500.

Surviving length 30mm. Surviving width 13mm. Maximum thickness 4.5mm. Weight 3.4g.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure.

Treasure details

Treasure case tracking number: 2014T928

 

35846_E03FD5_MED_FingerRing

 

 

FINGER RING

Unique ID: NMS-E03FD5

Medieval silver finger ring. Rectangular bezel with median longitudinal arris dividing two concave fields, the arris continuing through the shoulders at an angle, the band narrowing towards the rear. The shoulders either side of the arris are decorated with engraved sprays of five petalled flowers and leaves, the bezel with an indistinct design, perhaps foliate, and the rear of the hoop with closely spaced angled lines imitating twisting. Gilding survives over much of the internal and external surface. The rear of the hoop is now distorted. Height 20mm. Width 22mm. Width of bezel 8mm. Many similar decorative and iconographic rings are known, including Oman (1974) pl.22, B – E and pl.66, A – E, and an example in the collections of the British Museum (museum number AF.915). 15th century.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure.

Treasure details

Treasure case tracking number: 2014T929

 

57055_CC589F_MED_FingerRing

 

FINGER RING

Unique ID: NMS-CC589F

Medieval silver finger ring, now distorted. The front half of the band is decorated with three square bosses each with a quatrefoil reserved on a field of niello and separated from each other by concave sections with four deep longitudinal grooves, with three grooves on each shoulder converging before the flat-sectioned, narrowed rear of the band.

For broadly similar rings see NMS-EFD014, WILT-EBD251 and WAW-796003.

Circa 1100 – 1300.

Maximum width 5mm. Original external diameter circa 20mm. Weight 2.5g.

Subsequent actions

Subsequent action after recording: Returned to finder after being disclaimed as Treasure. 

Treasure details

Treasure case tracking number: 2014T919